Increase conversion rates by measuring bounce rates | LunaMetrics

Increase conversion rates by measuring bounce rates

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“Bounces” , also known as one-time page loads, one time access rates, or single page entries, measure visitors who enter your website and leave without looking at a second page. Not all bounce is bad (maybe they did need to view your home page just to find your phone number.) However, when your bounce rate (single page visits divided by entries on that page) gets very high, you’ve got a strong signal that the page is not working for you — it’s time for user testing or to consider some various alternatives and do split path testing.

How high is too high? Conversion Chronicles editor (CEO?) Steve Jackson wrote a great answer on the Web Analytic Forum. He cautioned that the rates he cites are only based on his own experience.

Similarly, I looked at a site a couple months ago and evaluated their top four entry pages. The home page had a bounce rate in the thirties, and I was pretty comfortable with that. (In addition to all those customers who are just looking for your phone number, plenty of visitors stop by your site by accident.) But the top two category pages had bounce rates over 75%. It was clear that the pages were “broken” — at least in the eyes of most users.

You may find that your web analytics don’t calculate your bounce rate. I created this workaround last fall: total exits from that page divided by total entries on that page. It’s very rough — after all, people have to leave someplace, but it helps you when you are comparing similar types of pages, such as all category pages. (Note: I eventually found that this was the inverse of Hack #58 in Web Site Measurement Hacks.)

Robbin Steif
LunaMetrics

Our owner and CEO, Robbin Steif, started LunaMetrics twelve years ago. She is a graduate of Harvard College and the Harvard Business School, and has served on the Board of Directors for the Digital Analytics Association. Robbin is a winner of a BusinessWomen First award, as well as a recent Diamond Award for business leadership. You should read her letter before you decide to work with us.

  • SiteSpect A/B Split and Multivariate Testing

    Bounce rate is a good metric, particularly for landing page optimization. For targeted landing pages or microsites where conversion is low, gathering enough conversion data to make a decision takes time. In this case, bounce rate provides an early indicator of success — basically its site-side click-thru-rate, and it lets you optimize how people move along from that first step (the landing page) into the rest of the persuasion process.

  • http://www.invesp.com/marketing-services/landing-page-creation-optimization.html Khalid Hajsaleh

    Robin,

    I think of bounce rate as the number of users who leave an entry page in less than (n) seconds where n is different from one site to another. n is how many seconds does it take for a user to meaningfully decide that your site is useful to them or not. For most websites, a user needs to spend at least 5 seconds to make that determination. If a user is spending less than that, then the traffic is meaningless. If we strictly define bounce rate is the number of users who visit one page and exit, that would completely change how we view bounce rate.

  • http://www.printingon5th.com San Diego Menu Printing

    Bounce rate is the percentage of visitors who enter a site and then leave immediately without visiting the deep links or other pages of the website. Bounce rate may be very from page to page or a website to another one. Actually, there is no industry standard available regarding this issue. I think you website content is most important and there are also many factors involved in bounce rate determination. Just try to reduce up to maximum limit.

    All the best!

    Alex

  • http://www.chauffeurlinks.com Executive Transfers

    Nice post, thank you. Nowadays every webmaster or site owner desired to reduce the bounce rate and increase the conversion rate. There are many factors of on-Page SEO involved which provide great help to increased the sales.

  • Pingback: Web Analytics Bounce Rate()

  • http://www.krabivilla.com Krabi

    Only website text or content can help you in this situation when your web page bounce is more than 50%. It true there is no proper standard available to check the bounce rate. while you are writing your website content then focused on customer desire, make your text easy to read and try to convey your message to the visitor in short space to time.

  • http://www.dacou.com.au Aboriginal Art

    I agreed with you “Krabi” that there is no proper scale to measure the bounce rate but we can minimize this rate up to maximum. Sometime we do not pay proper consideration in writing content. The right way is that…while you are writing content of your website then do not depend on or right for search and do keywords stuffing.

  • http://www.dacou.com.au Aboriginal Art

    I agreed with you “Krabi” that there is no proper scale to measure the bounce rate but we can minimize this rate up to maximum. Sometime we do not pay proper consideration in writing content. The right way is that…while you are writing content of your website then do not depend on or right for search and do keywords stuffing. It (content) should be informative and attractive.

    Thank you Robbin for sharing this great post and keep it up!

  • http://www.chmans.com Sheet Metal Fabrication

    I’m also SEO person but don’t know much about the Bounce rate. I think these are the number of people who visit your site. If the people are increasing in the site then it means the bounce rate is good but it is necessary that the visitor view the site more than 30 seconds.

    • Robbin

      Hi Sheet Metal. Bounce rate is usually considered a measure of badness, although like all of life, that can depend. A bounce happens when someone visits your site and leaves without doing another thing – usually that means, looking at another page, but in GA, triggering an event will also mean that they “did something” and no bounce occurs.

      Even if someone looks at your site for 10 minutes and leaves without doing something else, they still bounced. Also, their time on the page will not be measured until the web analytics have another “something” to measure against, because time on page is measured as the difference between entry to page A and entry to page B.

  • http://webservicescotland.com/ John

    So if i had a website, where all my articles were all readable on the homepage,ie they scrolled down to read, then although they have been on there for x amount of time, it counts as a bounce?

  • Robbin

    John — yes, you said that correctly. However, this is a very old blogpost, and in the interim, Google Analytics has created other “things” that interrupt a bounce, such as an event. If they hung around to look at a video and you had that video event-coded, it would not be a bounce. HTH

  • http://www.abouttoursco.com Chicago Tours

    I think Bounce rate is the percentage of visitors who enter a site and then leave immediately without visiting the deep links or other pages of the website. Bounce rate very from page to page or a website to another one.
    And it is true that there is no proper scale to measure the bounce rate but we can minimize this rate up to maximum…

    Thanks

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