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Author Archive

Campaign Tracking with a Dynamic Source

Where-do-you-come-fromDo you want to track your press releases or distributed content (widgets, infographics, embedded content, etc.)? I’m going to show you a much better way to do that with campaign tracking in Google Analytics.

I was recently asked a question by an attendee to our Google Analytics training in Los Angeles about using campaign tracking in Google Analytics:

We distribute press releases that get distributed and posted on various websites.  I want to be able to track any traffic generated by those pickups as part of a campaign, but also know from which sites the traffic is coming.  What happens is I simply leave utm_source out?

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Share Your Goals in Google Analytics

First there was the honorable GoalCopy plugin for Firefox, which ruled the kingdom for many (internet) years. This tool gave you the magical ability to copy goals from one profile (remember when that’s what they were called?) to another with ease. And the peasants rejoiced.

But then came v5 of Google Analytics, and with this new design the failings of the old king. GoalCopy was dethroned by it’s Chrome extension cousin,  GA Copy and Paste. It was visusally appealing and worked in the new interface. And the peasants rejoiced.

GA Copy and Paste met with its untimely demise when Google Analytics rolled out changes to the Admin, including Goals configuration. The Kingdom fell into chaos, with no ability to copy goals from one View to another. Until now.

Now we have learned of a noble warrior with a true bloodline, claiming the throne. This new leader calls itself by no name, it just sits there ready to copy your goals at a moments notice, either one at a time or in bulk.

You don’t have to download it. It isn’t browser specific. It’s a new feature in Google Analytics.

You can now share your goals. (more…)

Hands Free Google Analytics – “OK GA”

What do you do if you need to use Google Analytics, but you have a broken hand (or two)?

broken hands
This is the problem we were faced with last year, as two of our analysts were involved in separate bicycle accidents. Using a mouse and keyboard to navigate the reports in Google Analytics proved difficult, if not impossible, with hunks of plaster covering our hands and fingers. (more…)

Cross-Domain Tracking With Google Tag Manager

Keep calm and _setAllowLinker on
Cross-domain tracking has been the bane of any analyst’s experience for, oh, just about ever. It is probably the hardest thing to get right in a Google Analytics implementation, and in our experience, more people ask us for help with this one issue than any other.

Over the years we’ve dealt with this problem in different ways. jQuery made it easy to drop in a couple lines of code to track behavior across domains, but even then it wasn’t exactly automatic.

Then along came Universal Analytics and Google Tag Manager – the perfect 1-2 punch combo to knock out cross domain tracking once and for all. We held a webinar to show people step-by-step how to implement cross-domain tracking in Google Tag Manager. Below is a recording of the webinar, along with the written step-by-step instructions.
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Free Webinar: Cross Domain Tracking in Google Tag Manager

Cross Domain Tracking with Google Analytics

UPDATE: Due to events beyond our control, the webinar has been postponed until Tuesday, November 5th at 1:00pm EST. Our sincere apologies.

It’s been almost a year since Google Tag Manager was introduced, and as we scan the product forum, it’s clear there are still many questions about how it works (both generally and specifically). (more…)

How to Filter Bot Traffic From Your Google Analytics

UPDATE: July 30, 2014 – Google announced a feature to automatically filter out bots and spiders. Learn more here.

party crashers

Don’t let bad data crash your analytics party.

One of the benefits of client-side, tag-based analytics (as opposed to server side analytics) is that you generally don’t have to filter out traffic from bots.

However, it seems lately that some bots (*cough, cough* Microsoft) have been showing up in Google Analytics like an uninvited guest, crashing the data party. (more…)

Google Analytics Email Tracking, Part 2


In part 1 of this series, I showed you how to use Universal Analytics and the Measurement Protocol to track whether or not someone opened your email.

Now we’re going to kick it up a notch use email to tag visitors with a unique ID. This will let you track visitors to your site across devices, like below:

Email tracking in Google Analytics with MailChimp

 

We’ll continue from where we left off after the last post, so I’ll assume you’re already using Universal Analytics, and you have a custom metric set up to keep track of email opens. We’ll continue to use MailChimp to walk you through setting this up, but you should be able to apply these steps to whatever email marketing platform you’re using.

Step 1:

In step 1 of the last post, you created a custom metric in the Google Analytics admin interface called Email Opens to track the number of times an email was opened. This time, you’ll create a new custom dimension called Visitor ID to keep track of individual users.

Log in to Google Analytics and go to the Admin section. Select your account and web property, and click on Custom Definitions under the Web Property column. Then click on Custom Dimensions.

Custom Dimensions

In the next window, click on the New Custom Dimension button, and give your custom dimension a name (I recommend Visitor ID) and set the scope to User. Also, make sure the Active check box is checked.

Custom Dimension

Step 2:

Now that you’ve set up your custom dimension, it’s time to start populating it. In our example, we’re going to do that through email marketing. When someone opens your email, it will show up in Google Analytics as an email open from visitor ID 12345 (or whatever their ID is). And when they click on a link in the email, it will show up as a visit from that same visitor ID.

To do this in MailChimp, there’s a feature that we’ll take advantage of called Ecommerce 360 link tracking. You’ll find this in the Setup phase when you’re creating an email campaign – check the box for Ecommerce 360 link tracking:

MailChimp setup

MailChimp Ecommerce 360

So, what is Ecommerce 360? Basically, it makes it possible to track visitors from your email campaigns, capture transaction information, and pass it back to MailChimp.

But that’s not why we’re using it. We’re using it because when you have it enabled and someone clicks on one of your email links, it adds a couple of parameters to the end of your URL. Specifically, these are the parameters:

mc_cid=92383b3a63

mc_eid=9fe8ac1315

The mc_cid parameter is the internal MailChimp campaign ID and the mc_eid parameter is the unique, MailChimp-generated ID for the list member.

In other words, MailChimp is giving you the unique ID to use in your Visitor ID dimension!

Step 3:

To get that ID stored in your Visitor ID custom dimension, you’ll need a tiny bit of script on your page to check for that value in the URL and capture it. If you look at the source code on this site, you’ll see our Universal Analytics code has been updated to include this extra code (lines 9-17):

<script>
  (function(i,s,o,g,r,a,m){i['GoogleAnalyticsObject']=r;i[r]=i[r]||function(){
  (i[r].q=i[r].q||[]).push(arguments)},i[r].l=1*new Date();a=s.createElement(o),
  m=s.getElementsByTagName(o)[0];a.async=1;a.src=g;m.parentNode.insertBefore(a,m)
  })(window,document,'script','//www.google-analytics.com/analytics.js','ga');

$(document).ready(function() {
  ga('create', 'UA-296882-21', 'lunametrics.com');
   ga(function(tracker) {
	var hash = location.hash;
	var mcId = hash.match('mc_eid=(.*)');
	var cid = tracker.get('clientId');
		if(mcId){
		var vid = mcId[1];
	    ga('set', 'dimension1', vid);
		}
});
  ga('send', 'pageview');
});

</script>

Step 4:

With the script above, plus the Ecommerce 360 option in MailChimp, you’ll now be capturing the user ID of visitors who click on the links in your emails, but remember, we also want to do that if they open the email (without clicking a link).

To do that, we’re going to modify the code from step 6 in the previous post. This is where we’re placing our “fake” image at the bottom of the email that sends the data to Google Analytics:

<img src=”http://www.google-analytics.com/collect?v=1&tid=UA-XXXXXXX-YY&cid=*|UNIQID|*
&t=event&ec=email&ea=open&el=*|UNIQID|*&cs=newsletter&cm=email&cn=062413&cm1=1″ />

The only difference from the previous post (the code above) is that we’re now also going to add the unique ID to the custom dimension. We can do that as follows:

<img src=”http://www.google-analytics.com/collect?v=1&tid=UA-XXXXXXX-YY&cid=*|UNIQID|*
&t=event&ec=email&ea=open&el=*|UNIQID|*&cs=newsletter&cm=email&cn=062413&cm1=1&cd1=*|UNIQID|*″ />

 

The payoff

OK, so I admit that you’ll have to roll up your sleeves and get your hands a little dirty with some code. But your efforts will be rewarded with large sums of money and glory.

You’ll now be able to see the following scenario playing out in your data:

Visitor ID 12345 (which you can match back to John Q. Smith in MailChimp) opened your email on his phone on a Monday. Then he opened the same email from his computer on Tuesday and clicked the link to go to your site, where he browse around but didn’t convert. Then he came back to your site on Thursday and made a purchase (or signed up, subscribed, etc.).

Cross device nirvana!

 

Email Tracking in Google Analytics with MailChimp

This is Part 1 of a 2-part series. >> Part 2

The Problem:

You have some data about your email marketing (for example, open rate) in your email marketing software, and data about visits to your site from email marketing elsewhere (namely, Google Analytics).

Wouldn’t it be great to see an end-to-end view of all that data in one place? With Universal Analytics and the Measurement Protocol, you can, and I’ll show you how, step-by-step.

Today’s post will kick things off by looking first at how to track email opens in Google Analytics. My next post will show how to tag a visitor with a unique ID, so you’ll be able to track them across devices (like in the image below). Finally, we’ll tie it all together so you can see visitor behavior from opening your email to visiting your site and (hopefully!) converting.

Email tracking in Google Analytics with MailChimp

The Solution:

We’ll use MailChimp - a popular (and free, if you want to play along) email marketing manager to walk you through how to set this up, but you should be able to apply the same steps to any email marketing solution you use.
(more…)

Content Experiments JavaScript API

Caution - Test in ProgressGoogle Analytics Content Experiments are a great way to quickly and easily set up simple A/B tests for your website. And for most people, setting up these experiments can be done using the interface in Google Analytics.

However, there are some who desire a little more control over the variation pages, that just can’t be done through the setup wizard.

For example, when you’re choosing you’re variation pages, you can specify full (exact) URLs for the variations, or relative URLs. If you choose to specify the variations by the full URL, you’d end up with something like:

Original Page:

http://www.example.com/original.html

Variation 1:

http://www.example.com/variation1.html

Variation 2:

http://www.example.com/variation2.html

 

If you choose relative URLs, you can take advantage of query parameters to specify your variations. This makes it possible to do site-wide tests, by placing the Content Experiment code on every “original” page of the site. Then, for your variation URLs, you’d have:
(more…)

Google Analytics Campaign Tagging Tool

Want to know the ROI of your email marketing? What about the performance of your print ads? Are your posts to Facebook leading to conversions on your site?

Tagging your marketing campaigns is essential to get these actionable insights from Google Analytics. But you might have more than one person responsible for all of your marketing initiatives (imagine that!). You might have teams of marketers and content writers who all dip their hands in the the campaign cookie jar from time to time. That’s great! If you’ve gotten to the point where your non-web analyst peers are tagging their URLs with campaign parameters, you’ve already overcome the biggest hurdle. Now, if only you could get them all to use the same naming conventions… (more…)