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Archive for the ‘Google Tag Manager’ Category

Creative Tag Manager – Ads, Promotions, and Visitor Messaging

Google Tag Manager AdLet’s get creative with Google Tag Manager! Google Tag Manager has changed the way we implement Google Analytics here at LunaMetrics, making it easier to track pageviews, events, you name it. It’s excellent for adding marketing tags for Adwords or conversion tracking for any service you need. But many people gloss over the fact that GTM can deliver really any code that you want to your site. This includes HTML, CSS, and Javascript!

So let’s think outside of the Analytics box and talk about using GTM to add content to your site, specifically:

  • breaking news strips
  • fly-in promotion
  • expandable in-line messages

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8 Reasons to Start Using Google Tag Manager Now

With Universal Analytics out of beta (finally), many of us will begin making the transition from traditional Google Analytics. But not everyone realizes that this is also a great opportunity to implement Google Tag Manager while making the upgrade.  Implementing GTM is a straight-forward process and the capabilities are endless. In case you (or someone you know) need some convincing, or if you have just been delaying, this article quickly summarizes 8 reasons why you should be using Google Tag Manager now.

 

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Automate GTM’s Lookup Table Macro from a Spreadsheet

Upside down house

Get it? It’s an upside-down house. She’s looking up at a table!

Earlier this year, Google Tag Manager added a great new feature called the Lookup Table Macro. It’s pretty simple to use. Populate the table with two columns of data. Feed a value into it using a macro and if it finds that value in the left column, it will return the value next to it. This useful macro isn’t meant to replace complicated Javascript switch statements or advanced regular expressions. But it can take a large list of data and save us lots of time! (more…)

Google Tag Manager Readiness Checklist: 42 Ways to Prep Your Site

Don’t wait until you urgently need a new tag to discover you also need your developers. Put the right infrastructure in place and reap the full benefits of Google Tag Manager.

May 25 is Towel Day

Google Tag Manager is so easy to use, you can start adding tags to a site as soon as the developers put up the GTM container code. To make the most of it, though, you will need your developers’ help.

Some information should not (or cannot) be hard-coded into the tags, because it depends on each visitor’s behavior on your site. What did the visitor buy? What articles did they read? What videos did they watch? What forms did they complete? I could go on (and do, below).

Your developers can pull information from the back-end of your site and make it available on the page. They can also prepare various page elements to work with Google Tag Manager’s listeners, rules, and macros. It all means smoother sailing for you when you want to add tags later.

Follow this checklist to prep your site for Google Tag Manager, and you’ll be ready for almost any tagging request. You’ll be the hero who always knows where your towel is.
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Introducing Google Tag Manager Training

gtm-trainingLearn about Google Tag Manager, get your hands dirty, and get your questions answered… in less than a day. We are proud to introduce a brand new training course: Google Tag Manager – Basics & Beyond! This is a hands-on, intensive workshop, debuting in New York City for Internet Week on Thursday, May 22nd, at SUNY Global Center in Manhattan.

This workshop will be significantly different than our other trainings. It will be more interactive: LunaMetrics will provide a live demo sandbox, where attendees will practice setting up Google Analytics events to track button clicks, form submits, and other JavaScript interactions, all through Google Tag Manager. It will be more collaborative: a limited number of seats ensures that each attendee will be able to sit with our qualified trainers and talk through their specific questions relating to their own implementations. And it will be more intensive: the course will run for a half day, and it will be packed with both technical and strategic components, providing real-world implementation techniques you can enact on your own website right away.
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Say Goodbye to Exclude Filters in Google Analytics!

Use Google Tag Manager to Protect Your DataNo need to panic, Exclude Filters aren’t going away anytime soon! However, after reading this post you may not WANT to use Exclude Filters as frequently.  There are still many valid reasons why you may need to set them up, but when possible – it might be time to eliminate them.

Just as a quick refresher, you can use the Exclude Filters in Google Analytics to block traffic data from certain sources from showing up in a particular view.  Sometimes these are used to partition data into one view or another, for example, think of creating separate views for Internal or External Traffic.  For these use cases, Filters work beautifully. You can filter based off of IP Address, Hostname, Service Provider, etc…

But then there are those occasions where you want to block out traffic completely.  Just as easily, you can set up an Exclude filter for each of your views, and poof! The data has disappeared!  Except, it hasn’t really.

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Segment Your Bounce Rate – GA’s Full Potential

segment your bounces finished

Not All Bounces are Created Equal

Interaction Events and Bounce Rate

The great customizability of Google Analytics implementations can at times be a double-edged sword. We are living in the golden age of analytics and we of course we want to collect as much metadata associated with our traffic as possible. The caveat is that, with each added layer of complexity to our GA tracking, we must ensure consistency across our website. We must be especially careful that our KPIs are comparable for cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis. (more…)

Google Tag Manager Disaster Recovery Guide

Dave on a space odyssey

Some day, even after diligently testing, you may publish a new version of your Google Tag Manager container and disaster will strike. The site, or some critical site function, will break. Or tracking will drop to zero. (Or both!) Will you be ready to fix things?

It’s as easy as “the click of a button” to revert to a previous, working version of your tag container, according to many articles about Google Tag Manager. What most of these articles do not say is which button to choose.

Yes, there’s more than one way to restore a previous version. (more…)

Classify your Blog Posts in Analytics Using Content Groupings

holy-grailToday we are going to go on a quest to find the scientifically-proven best blog post ever. We will do so with math.

We have a hypothesis: the best blog post ever must contain these five things:

A handful of tasteful images
A YouTube video
A length between 1200 and 1500 words
A concise title
Published on a Friday

On December 19th, Google Analytics introduced a new feature called Content Grouping. Long in the making, this feature allows analysts to combine common pages by way of Rules, URL/Title Extraction, or with a piece of JavaScript placed on those pages.

Then, just yesterday, Google Tag Manager introduced an integration with this piece of JavaScript, so that its built-in Analytics tags could define content groupings based on Rules/Macros.

And there was much rejoicing.

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Using ALL of Google Webmaster Tools data to tackle (not provided)

Raptor too excited and falls

My reaction to the GWT New Year’s Update

I couldn’t believe it when I saw the January 7, 2014th Webmaster Tools update,

“data in the search queries feature will no longer be rounded / bucketed.”

At first I thought, why would Google go through all that trouble to obfuscate keyword data in Google Analytics, when they planned on handing all that data back through the search query reports in Webmaster Tools? And of course, they didn’t plan on anything of the sort. The relatively minor update only removes bucketing, and does not address the big issue, that they display only 20% to 25% of search query data. I held out hope that, as it appears in the before and after pictures, the sampling rate had been increased from around 20% to around 35%. But while I’ve noticed small changes in some accounts, it does not appear they’ve made this improvement. (more…)